Heart Disease and Inflammation

Heart Disease and Inflammation

Hi….

Are you confused with so many different information, study results, recommendations out there?

To tell you the truth, I used to be. So many contradictory information!!!  Do you remember the coconut oil “saga”.  Not to mention cholesterol. For decades it was blamed for heart attack. The low fat/ no fat diet craze took over the world and hijacked our health.  Look at the food pyramid!! Recommending inflammation causing food!!

I could go on and on (trust me on that).

So how can we sort out what information to accept as “the truth” or study result as acceptable, what recommendations to follow? The answer is simple. Depending where is the information coming from. Is the source trustworthy, serving our best health or maybe motivated by profit (you know what I mean; prescriptions, a lot of them).

After many years studying human body, pathology and disease my latest focus in my work is on INFLAMMATION. It is the root cause of many chronic diseases of our modern time, including heart disease.

I would like to share a study with you that gives us hope. Especially for us who have heart attacks in our family history.

INTERHEART study (conducted in 52 countries) revealed that approximately 90% of heart diseases could be simply prevented by diet and lifestyle changes. That means 9 out of 10 cases of heart disease can be prevented without drugs. This is huge!!!!

This is a phenomenal news, because it gives us empowerment and hope that we can change our current situation. So, if you are awake late at night wondering are you going to die of heart attack just like mother did this is a great news for you. No more sleepless nights.

To understand the changes we need to make, let’s examine what are the causes. We know so far, it’s not cholesterol. The two most important causes are

  1. INFLAMMATION and
  2. OXIDATIVE DAMAGE

The top four causes of inflammation and oxidative damage are:

  1. Diet
  2. Stress
  3. Physical inactivity
  4. Smoking

Focusing on reducing the factors that contribute to inflammation and oxidative stress we can create better health and a different reality for ourselves. We can feel empowered and take our health in our own hands.

Let’s explore our diet.

The SAD (Standard American Diet) is inflammatory, making us fat and starving our cells at the same time. It is loaded with chemicals (many of them harmful), voided of nutrients, providing empty calories.

What is in SAD?

  1. Highly processed carbohydrates
  2. Sugar and HFCS
  3. Gluten
  4. Casein
  5. Vegetable and seed oil
  6. MSG
  7. Aspartame
  8. Chemicals (emulsifiers, preservatives, colorings etc.)

No wonder why we are inflamed, sick, overweight and overmedicated.

Food should be our medicine. It should make our bodies thrive, create health and longevity. Whole, nutrient dense food gives the right information for our genes (yes, food is information), provides building blocks for our cells, energy and support for our cells to thrive.

In the next email we will explore more in detail food that calms inflammation.


RECIPE

Quinoa Breakfast Bowl
Serves 1

  • 1 tbsp ground chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup canned, light coconut milk (carrageenan free)
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa, cooled
  • 1 orange, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1/2 cup fresh raspberries
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp hemp seeds, chopped raw walnuts, or chopped raw cashews
  1. Mix the chia seeds with coconut milk and nutmeg in a small bowl and let sit for one hour. This can be done the night before.
  2. Place the cooked quinoa in a medium bowl and add the chia mixture. Mix together.
  3. Mix in the orange pieces and raspberries.
  4. Drizzle the maple syrup on top and top with seeds or nuts or choice.

To cook the quinoa:

  1. Rinse 1/4 cup of dried quinoa in a sieve.
  2. Place in a pot with 2 cups of water and 1/8 teaspoon of sea salt.
  3. Bring to a boil, lower to simmer and cook until the quinoa reaches the desired texture. Normal instructions for cooking quinoa would say only use double the amount of water for the quinoa, but for quinoa, time and temperature are key to preventing the quinoa from being crunchy. Adding extra water allows you to cook it to the texture you like best.
  4. Rinse the quinoa after cooking. This can be prepared ahead of time and the quinoa stored in the refrigerator, or the quinoa can be cooked at the same time as the rest of the meal but start the quinoa first as it will take 25-30 minutes.

To your radiant health, with love

PS! I am still offering free consultation for breast cancer survivors this month. Sign up using this link: https://my.timetrade.com/book/6ZDTG

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Pink Ribbon Month

It’s Pink Ribbon Month

Its October already but temperatures here in Western PA are still in mid-eighties.

October is breast cancer awareness month when pink ribbons, pink ponies, pink hairs and bumper stickers are showing up daily. Everyone is talking about early detection. Which is great!!! Don’t get me wrong. Early detection means a better outcome. The problem that makes me so upset is that almost no one is talking about PREVENTION.

So maybe instead of early detection, we should start even a stronger campaign about REAL PREVENTION.!!

Ladies, we know cancer is an amazing money-making machine. It brings billions to the table. Everyone will benefit from it. Hospitals, will create new jobs, medical sales, biotech companies, not to mention drug manufacturers, hospices etc…who is hurting in this process? US!!! Yes, us ladies.

So here is what I am thinking. Maybe, just maybe the companies who promote those pink ribbons and pink whatever should clean up their products focusing more on PREVENTION. We know their products are filled with cancer-promoting ingredients such as mineral oils, phthalates, mica, talc, parabens, petroleum derivatives, just to name a few.

This is my big pet peeves ladies!!!!

Let’s talk about some prevention because I care about you and our sisters.

PREVENTION TIPS

Here are a few steps to help you with breast cancer (and cancer in general) prevention.

  1. Clean up your diet (don’t ingest chemicals). Our body thrives on whole food, that comes from nature, the way God created it. Don’t buy packaged food, fast food, and toxin-laden food.
  2. Clean up your skincare and makeup. Be mindful of deodorants and antiperspirants. Use aluminum and paraben-free.
  3. Pay attention to your bras. Whenever possible go bra-less (at home), if you can (and is culturally acceptable) exercise braless or at least wear a loose fitting sports bra. Our boobs need to move in order to drain toxins (including carcinogens). Hop on a trampoline and jump for a couple of minutes to stimulates lymph drainage including from your breast. Try to do it without wearing a bra. Your boobs will thank you for that. A bra will compress breasts and block the lymph drainage so the toxic materials will stay longer in contact. Don’t wear bras with the metal wire (they can be irradiated). Choose cotton bras (if possible white, organic).
  4. Eliminate or at least minimize plastic. Don’t fall for BPA free labels. BPA free contains BPS and BPF that are even worse than BPA (BPA stands for Bisphenol A, BPF is Bisphenol S and BPF is Bisphenol F). Did you know that BPA was isolated from breast cancer cells? Never heat your food in plastic containers (microwave) or freeze your drinks. High and low temperatures will cause bisphenols to leach into your food and water because they are unstable at low and high temperatures. Use stainless steel or glass bottles for your water. Don’t waste your money on bottled water. The quality of the water is poor, you don’t know how much chemical is being released into that water. If you want quality water, invest in a good filtration system. That will be a worthwhile investment.
  5. Move your body. Yes, we need movement. Our bodies thrive on movement. Find an exercise you like, it’s fun for you and do it. Movement helps with everything. Moving lymph, moving toxins, helps with regularity, builds your immune system, helps with better sleep, etc.
  6. Manage stress. Chronic stress will lower immune function and make us susceptible to many diseases.
  7. Have a healthy 7-8 hour sleep.
  8. Restore your gut health and microbiome. We want to have a strong immune system that will fight against cancer cells. About 80% of our immune system resides in our gut.
  9. Check your breasts regularly. If you are noticing any change don’t panic, but visit your doctor to check them out.
  10. And the last but not least one of the best cancer-preventing activities, that won’t cost you a dime is There are so many benefits of fasting that simply we can’t afford to do it.

Fasting activates autophagy (the cleaning process, when we remove damaged cells, cell parts, etc.), cancer cells hate not having food and will leave. As we know cancer cells thrive on sugar, so eliminating sugar is one of the first steps every cancer patient should be doing!!! Besides fasting the KETOGENIC DIET is also very useful for cancer patients because cancer cells can’t use ketones.

I hope ladies this will be helpful to you. Please share this information with your daughters, sisters, friends, nieces. They need to hear this information!!!

If you are a survivor or undergoing treatment or have breast cancer in your family, hit reply to this email. I would like to talk to you. I am paying it forward and gifting you with a free consultation. Let’s talk.


RECIPE

Berry Yogurt Smoothie
Serves 1

  • 3/4 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 3/4 cup fresh or frozen raspberries
  • 1/2 cup coconut yogurt
  • 1 cup almond or coconut milk (carrageenan free)
  • 2 tsp ground chia seeds
  • 2 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 orange, peeled and broken into segments
  • 1 portion unsweetened, unflavoured protein powder of choice
  • Non-chlorinated water to adjust consistency, if needed
  1. Place all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Transfer to a glass and serve.

To your radiant health, with love

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee – Who can drink it and who should avoid it?

Coffee – Who can drink it and who should avoid it?

Coffee is one of those things- you either love it or hate it. You know if you like the taste or not (or if it’s just a reason to drink sugar and cream). You know how it makes you feel (i.e. your gut, your mind, etc.).

I must admit I like coffee and drink it regularly. I like especially my morning coffee. Having it first thing in the morning is like a ritual for me. I drink Turkish coffee in my pj’s.

What about you?

Not to mention the crazy headlines that say coffee is great, and the next day you should avoid it!

There is actual science behind why different people react differently to it. It’s a matter of your genetics and how much coffee you’re used to drinking.

NOTE: Coffee does not equal caffeine. Coffee contains between 50-400 mg of caffeine/cup, averaging around 100 mg/cup. Coffee is one of the most popular ways to consume this stimulant. But…a cup of coffee contains a lot of things over and above the caffeine. Not just water, but antioxidants, and hundreds of other compounds. These are the reasons drinking a cup of coffee is not the same as taking a caffeine pill. And decaffeinated coffee has a lot less caffeine; but, it still contains some.

Let’s look at caffeine metabolism, its effects on the mind and body, and whether coffee drinkers have higher or lower risks of disease. Then I’ll give you some things to consider when deciding if coffee is for you or not.

Caffeine metabolism

Not all people metabolize caffeine at the same speed. How fast you metabolize caffeine will impact how you’re affected by the caffeine. In fact, caffeine metabolism can be up to 40x faster in some people than others.

About half of us are “slow” metabolizersof caffeine. We can get jitters, heart palpitations, and feel “wired” for up to 9 hours after having a coffee. The other half is “fast” metabolizers of caffeine. They get energy and increased alertness and are back to normal a few hours later.

This is part of the reason those headlines contradict each other so much – because we’re all different!

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body also differ between people; this is partly from the metabolism I mentioned. But it also has to do with your body’s amazing ability to adapt (read: become more tolerant) to long-term caffeine use. Many people who start drinking coffee feel the effects a lot more than people who have coffee every day.

Here’s a list of these effects (that usually decrease with long-term use):

  • Stimulates the brain
  • Boosts metabolism
  • Boosts energy and exercise performance
  • Increases your stress hormone cortisol
  • Dehydrates

So, while some of these effects are good and some aren’t, you need to see how they affect you and decide if it’s worth it or not.

Coffee and health risks

There area ton of studies on the health effects of coffee, and whether coffee drinkers are more or less likely to get certain conditions.

Here’s a quick summary of what coffee can lead to:

  • Caffeine addiction and withdrawal symptoms (e.g. a headache, fatigue, irritability)
  • Increased sleep disruption
  • Lower risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
  • Lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes
  • Lower risk of certain liver diseases
  • Lower risk of death
  • Mixed reviews on whether it lowers risks of cancer and heart disease

Many of the health benefits exist even for decaf coffee (except the caffeine addiction and sleep issues).

What’s super-important to note here is that coffee intake is just one of many, many factors that can affect your risks for these diseases. Please never think regular coffee intake is the one thing that can help you overcome these risks. You are health-conscious and know that eating a nutrient-rich whole foods diet, reducing stress, and getting enough sleep and exercise are all critical things to consider for your disease risk. It’s not just about the coffee.

Should you drink coffee or not?

There area few things to consider when deciding whether you should drink coffee. No one food or drink will make or break your long-term health.

Caffeinated coffee is not recommended for:

  • People with arrhythmias (e.g. irregular heartbeat)
  • People who often feel anxious
  • People who have trouble sleeping
  • People who are pregnant
  • Children and teens.

If none of these apply, then monitor how your body reacts when you have coffee. Does it:

  • Give you the jitters?
  • Increase anxious feelings?
  • Affect your sleep?
  • Give you heart palpitations?
  • Affect your digestion (e.g. heartburn, etc.)?
  • Give you a reason to drink a lot of sugar and cream?

Depending on how your body reacts, decide whether these reactions are worth it to you. If you’re not sure, I recommend eliminating it for a while and see the difference.

Also take note. Have organic coffee whenever possible. Coffee beans are a sensitive plant and prone to molding. So conventionally grown coffee beans are treated with lots of chemicals.

Also, are you aware what is in your coffee? Are you putting a lot of sugar and cream? Hmm…maybe not the best idea.

The season of pumpkins are upon us.


RECIPE (Latte)

Pumpkin Spice Latte

Serves: 1

  • 3 tbsp coconut milk
  • 1 ½ tsp pumpkin pie spice (or cinnamon)
  • ¼ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp pumpkin puree
  • ½ tsp maple syrup (optional)
  • 1 cup coffee (decaf if preferred)

 

Instructions: Add all ingredients to blender and blend until creamy.

 

To your radiant health, with love

How junk food tricks you into eating too much

How junk food tricks you into eating too much

I read a study the other day that I just had to share with you, because it personally made me even more committed to eating a diet based on real, whole foods.

It’s all about how ultra-processed foods make us want to eat more.

Here are the basics of what they found: people who eat a diet of “ultra-processed” food take in more calories and gain more weight than people who eat less-processed food – even when they are given meals containing the same calories and macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbs).

The study was conducted by the National Institutes for Health.

Scientists had 10 men and 10 women check into a clinic for a month and fed them a controlled diet. For two weeks they were given meals consisting of ultra-processed foods, and then for another two weeks they ate a diet of minimally processed foods. They could eat as much of their meals as they wanted.

As an example, an ultra-processed breakfast was a bagel with favored cream cheese and sweetened tea, while a whole foods breakfast included oatmeal, bananas, walnuts, and almond milk.

When they were given the “ultra” processed diet, the study subjects ate their meals faster AND consumed about 500 more calories a day… not surprisingly, they also gained an average of about 2 pounds!

Meanwhile, they lost about 2 pounds on the minimally processed diet.

This is the first study to ever show a direct relationship between processed foods and weight gain when other factors are controlled. Even so, it’s something we’ve kind of known over the years, right?

But here’s the kicker: processed foods are filled with things that make us want to eat more – salt, sugar, and unhealthy fats. So not only are they linked with eating more, they ALSO contribute to chronic health problems!

When we eat MORE of those foods, we’re taking in yet more things that are not good for us! (other studieshave suggested that junk foods are engineered specifically to make us want to eat more.)

Here’s another thing “shocking-not shocking” aspect of the study: the processed diet was actually much CHEAPER (by almost 50%!).

Scientists estimated the weekly cost to prepare 2,000 calories a day of the ultra-processed diet at $106, while the minimally processed diet cost $151, based on the prices at a nearby supermarket.

Here’s my personal takeaway on this one.

The food you eat is SO MUCH more than just “calories.”

It has a powerful effect on your health and well-being… and eating a healthy, whole-foods-based diet makes a strong statement to manufacturers when it comes to our food supply.

Over time, extra calories add up, and that extra weight can lead to serious health conditions. We are facing epidemics of obesity and chronic conditions like never before.

If you think healthy eating is expensive, I challenge you to do some research and find out what is the cost of diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, cancer etc.

How can you save money when it comes to eating a healthy diet?

  1. Buy in bulk and buy locally
  2. Shop sales,
  3. Use your freezer as much as possible
  4. Batch cooking
  5. Meal planning

If you need help coming up with healthy meal ideas that are affordable let me know. We are alw­ays here to help. Just reply to this email and I will be back to you shortly.


RECIPE

Quinoa Veggie Bowl

Serves 1

  • 1 cup quinoa, cooked
  • 1/2 sweet potato, cut into chunks and cooked
  • 1/4 avocado, diced
  • 5 cherry tomatoes, cut into quarters
  • 2 tbsp onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp tamari or coconut aminos
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped
  • Black pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup sauerkraut

Place all of the ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Adjust seasoning to taste. Serve.

To your radiant health, with love

Why is My Metabolism Slow?

Why is My Metabolism Slow?

You may feel tired, cold or that you’ve gained weight.  Maybe your digestion seems a bit more “sluggish”.
You may be convinced that your metabolism is slow.

Why does this happen?  Why do metabolic rates slow down?

What can slow my metabolism?

Metabolism includes all of the biochemical reactions in your body that use nutrients and oxygen to create energy.  And there are lots of factors that affect how quickly (or slowly) it works, i.e. your “metabolic rate” (which is measured in calories).

But don’t worry – we know that metabolic rate is much more complicated than the old adage “calories in calories out”!  In fact it’s so complicated I’m only going to list a few of the common things that can slow it down.

Examples of common reasons why metabolic rates can slow down:

  • low thyroid hormone
  • your history of dieting
  • your size and body composition
  • your activity level
  • lack of sleep

We’ll briefly touch on each one below and I promise to give you better advice than just to “eat less and exercise more”.

Low thyroid hormones

Your thyroid is the master controller of your metabolism.  When it produces fewer hormones your metabolism slows down.  The thyroid hormones (T3 & T4) tell the cells in your body when to use more energy and become more metabolically active.  Ideally it should work to keep your metabolism just right.  But there are several things that can affect it and throw it off course.  Things like autoimmune diseases and mineral deficiencies (e.g. iodine or selenium) for example.

Tip: Talk with your doctor about having your thyroid hormones tested.

Your history of dieting

When people lose weight their metabolic rate often slows down.  This is because the body senses that food may be scarce and adapts by trying to continue with all the necessary life functions and do it all with less food.

While dieting can lead to a reduction in amount of fat it unfortunately can also lead to a reduction in the amount of muscle you have.  As you know more muscle means faster resting metabolic rate.

Tip: Make sure you’re eating enough food to fuel your body without overdoing it.

Your size and body composition

In general, larger people have faster metabolic rates.  This is because it takes more energy to fuel a larger body than a smaller one.

However, you already know that gaining weight is rarely the best strategy for increasing your metabolism.

Muscles that actively move and do work need energy. Even muscles at rest burn more calories than fat.  This means that the amount of energy your body uses depends partly on the amount of lean muscle mass you have.

Tip: Do some weight training to help increase your muscle mass.

Which leads us to…

Your activity level

Aerobic exercise temporarily increases your metabolic rate.  Your muscles are burning fuel to move and do “work” and you can tell because you’re also getting hotter.

Even little things can add up.  Walking a bit farther than you usually do, using a standing desk instead of sitting all day, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator can all contribute to more activity in your day.

Tip:  Incorporate movement into your day.  Also, exercise regularly.

Lack of sleep

There is plenty of research that shows the influence that sleep has on your metabolic rate.  The general consensus is to get 7-9 hours of sleep every night.

Tip: Try to create a routine that allows at least 7 hours of sleep every night.

Recipe (Selenium-rich): Chocolate Chia Seed Pudding
Serves 4  

  • ½ cup Brazil nuts
  • 2 cups water
  • Nut bag or several layers of cheesecloth (optional)
  • ½ cup chia seeds
  • ¼ cup unsweetened cacao powder
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup

Blend Brazil nuts in water in a high-speed blender until you get smooth, creamy milk.  If desired, strain it with a nut bag or several layers of cheesecloth.

Add Brazil nut milk and other ingredients into a bowl and whisk until combined.  Let sit several minutes (or overnight) until desired thickness is reached.

To your radiant health, with love

What Makes Broccoli and Kale Superfoods?

What Makes Broccoli and Kale Superfoods?

Broccoli and kale are often touted to be “superfoods.” And, yes, they really are amazingly healthy for you.

If you’re wondering what exactly is in these green powerhouses that makes them so “super,” I’ve dived into the research to give you some nerdy reasons to make these a staple in your diet.

To start, they’re both considered cruciferous vegetables related to each other in the Brassicafamily. This family of super plants also includes cauliflower, cabbage, mustard greens, and Brussels sprouts.

These superfoods have a ton of nutrition, and other health-promoting compounds, they’re relatively inexpensive and easy to cook too!

Super nutrition

Broccoli and kale are full of nutrition: vitamins, minerals, fiber, etc. They’re both considered to be nutrient dense which is a measure of nutrients per calorie – and these both have a lot!

100 grams of broccoli (about 1 cup, chopped) contains:

  • 34 calories
  • 8 g protein, 0.4 g fat, 6.6 g carbohydrates, and 2.6 g fiber
  • Good source of B vitamins (when eaten raw)
  • >100% of your daily vitamin C
  • Almost 100% of your vitamin K
  • Good source of manganese
  • Traces of all the other vitamins and minerals

One cup of loosely packed kale contains:

  • 8 calories
  • 7 g protein, 0.2 g fat (including omega-3), 1.4 g carbohydrates, and 0.6 g fiber
  • Contains pre-vitamin A (beta-carotene).
  • Several B vitamins, including B1, B3, B5, B6, and folate (B9)
  • Rich in vitamins C and K
  • Lots of minerals including manganese, magnesium, iron, potassium, sulfur, copper, phosphorus, and calcium

As you can see, these two foods contain a lot of nutrients.

NOTE: Too much vitamin K may interact with certain blood-thinning medications. If you’re taking one of these medications, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before incorporating too much of these superfoods into your diet.

Broccoli and kale also contain other health-promoting compounds.

Super health-promoting compounds

 Broccoli and kale tend to taste a bit bitter – but that bitterness equals healthfulness!

 This bitter flavoor is from some of the health-promoting compounds in these super plant foods. Things like glucosinolates (e.g., sulforaphane and isothiocyanates) and polyphenol flavonols.

There are a few different types of kale – from curly kale, to dinosaur kale, to red/purple kale. The different colors result from slight differences in the amounts of the compounds these plants contain.

One of the main active ingredients in cruciferous vegetables are glucosinolates. These antioxidant compounds are very useful to help detoxify and protect against cancer.

FUN FACT: It’s the precursors to glucosinolates that are in cruciferous vegetables, not the compounds themselves. When fresh broccoli and kale are eaten (or even chopped/blended) raw the active compounds are produced. *This fact is incorporated into a trick I use in this week’s recipe*
NOTE: Glucosinolates may affect iodine absorption and thyroid health, particularly in people prone to thyroid disease. In this case, you may not have to ditch these superfoods altogether – just cook them first.

These superfoods also contain flavonols like kaempferol and quercetin. Flavonols have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and they decrease your risk of cancer.

Kale also contains carotenoids like lutein and zeaxanthin. Carotenoids are known for promoting eye health and are protective against many cancers.

When cooked, kale contains another anti-cancer compound called indole.

Conclusion

Broccoli and kale are cruciferous superfoods. They are packed with nutrition and have a whole array of health-promoting compounds.

Almost everyone should be eating these regularly. Just be cautious if you’re taking blood-thinning medications; and, if you have thyroid issues, cook them first.

Do you, or anyone you know, absolutely love (or hate) these superfoods? Do you have a favorite recipe to share? Let me know in the comments below.

Recipe (Broccoli & Kale): Superfood Soup
Serves 4

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp garlic, chopped
2 large handfuls kale
4 stalks celery, chopped
4 stalks broccoli chopped
8 cups broth
½ cup tahini
2 tsp sea salt

Instructions

Sauté garlic in olive oil in a large soup pot. At the same time do steps #2 and #3.
Add half of the raw kale, celery, and broccoli to your high-speed blender (in that order). Cover with up to 4 cups of broth and blend.
Pour soup into the pot with the sautéed garlic. Do the same for the other half of the veggies and broth.
Heat soup and simmer for up to 5 minutes.
Remove from heat. Add tahini and sea salt. Stir well.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: If you want the soup to be extra creamy, you can re-blend after it’s heated.

To your radiant health, with love,

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